Home Buying Tips for People with Disabilities

If you’re a home buyer looking for a property that meets accessibility needs for a disability, you’ll have a lot of additional steps to take. Best-case scenario: you can work with a realtor who has experience finding accessible homes. However, since most homes on the market are not built in mind for accessibility, you will likely have to expand your search to homes that can be easily modified. When you’re house hunting for or with a disability, here are some things to keep in mind to help the process go more smoothly.

Get Your Finances In Line

There are a lot of financial considerations to make when you decide to buy a house, and even more when you are looking for a home that is accessible or needs modifications. First, it’s important for anyone on the house hunting cricut to work on improving your credit score. A higher credit rating is your ticket to lower interest rates on your mortgage. Snag a copy of your credit report and work on paying off any outstanding debt. Even small payoffs can make a big impact. Not only will this help with your mortgage rates, but it can also help you apply for special loans just for people with disabilities. Some of these loans will help with the cost of your home, while others can help you pay for modifications you need to make to increase accessibility.

Know Your Rights

People with disabilities have very specific and important federal and state rights when they become house buyers. According to the Fair Housing Act, a person with a disability cannot be discriminated against by lenders, realtors or home sellers because of the disability. On the other hand, it’s important to understand that the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) doesn’t apply to private property, so sellers aren’t obligated to make modifications for accessibility because you someone with a disability wants to make an offer. When talking to realtors, ask if they have experience finding homes for people with disabilities. Make sure to work with one who will respect and protect your rights.

List Your Pre-Moving Action Items

Even before you land your dream home, it’s important to plan out what you’ll need to take care of before move-in day. First, you need to know what accessibility means to you. You can make a list of the modifications you need and want. If you are unsure, consult with an inspector. If your home isn’t fully accessible, you’ll want to know what must be done before you move in and what can wait. Talk with a contractor to find out how to plan out these modifications. You’ll also want to make sure you line up movers and packers (packers charge $35 – $40 on average) to take more stress off your plate. Your new home might need a few touches before you move in, as well. For example, it’s always a good idea to get the locks changed or even upgraded. Once you know your closing date, you can schedule a locksmith, just be sure to budget for around $96 – $210 for this service. While it seems like something you can forgo, remember, you don’t know how many keys to your home are in the hands of strangers.

If you’re a home buyer looking for a property that meets accessibility needs for a disability, you’ll have a lot of additional steps to take. Best-case scenario: you can work with a realtor who has experience finding accessible homes. However, since most homes on the market are not built in mind for accessibility, you will likely have to expand your search to homes that can be easily modified. When you’re house hunting for or with a disability, here are some things to keep in mind to help the process go more smoothly.

Get Your Finances In Line

There are a lot of financial considerations to make when you decide to buy a house, and even more when you are looking for a home that is accessible or needs modifications. First, it’s important for anyone on the house hunting cricut to work on improving your credit score. A higher credit rating is your ticket to lower interest rates on your mortgage. Snag a copy of your credit report and work on paying off any outstanding debt. Even small payoffs can make a big impact. Not only will this help with your mortgage rates, but it can also help you apply for special loans just for people with disabilities. Some of these loans will help with the cost of your home, while others can help you pay for modifications you need to make to increase accessibility.

Know Your Rights

People with disabilities have very specific and important federal and state rights when they become house buyers. According to the Fair Housing Act, a person with a disability cannot be discriminated against by lenders, realtors or home sellers because of the disability. On the other hand, it’s important to understand that the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) doesn’t apply to private property, so sellers aren’t obligated to make modifications for accessibility because you someone with a disability wants to make an offer. When talking to realtors, ask if they have experience finding homes for people with disabilities. Make sure to work with one who will respect and protect your rights.

List Your Pre-Moving Action Items

Even before you land your dream home, it’s important to plan out what you’ll need to take care of before move-in day. First, you need to know what accessibility means to you. You can make a list of the modifications you need and want. If you are unsure, consult with an inspector. If your home isn’t fully accessible, you’ll want to know what must be done before you move in and what can wait. Talk with a contractor to find out how to plan out these modifications. You’ll also want to make sure you line up movers and packers (packers charge $35 – $40 on average) to take more stress off your plate. Your new home might need a few touches before you move in, as well. For example, it’s always a good idea to get the locks changed or even upgraded. Once you know your closing date, you can schedule a locksmith, just be sure to budget for around $96 – $210 for this service. While it seems like something you can forgo, remember, you don’t know how many keys to your home are in the hands of strangers.

From mobility issues to low or impaired vision, there are almost 60 million people in the United States living with a disability. It’s important for everyone who wants to own a home to feel supported in a house that is safe and empowered to live independently. Whether you are looking to live on your own or searching for a home for a loved one with a disability, planning, preparing and actually buying a new home can be an exciting adventure.

From mobility issues to low or impaired vision, there are almost 60 million people in the United States living with a disability. It’s important for everyone who wants to own a home to feel supported in a house that is safe and empowered to live independently. Whether you are looking to live on your own or searching for a home for a loved one with a disability, planning, preparing and actually buying a new home can be an exciting adventure.